The Tenerife players celebrate Women’s Day together and with pride.

DEPT. CB CLARINOS COMMUNICATION

Unstoppable, fighters, indefatigable. The Tenerife players wear and defend purple in every game, but this time they come together to extol this color for women and to show how far we still have to go.

Throughout this week we celebrate Women’s Day because there is still a long way to go towards equality. The team captain, Esther Montenegro, remembers that a few years ago “they looked at you strangely when you said you were a professional basketball player. People were not very familiar, but now the situation has changed. That people turn on the television and see girls playing soccer, tennis, basketball, helps us to make ourselves visible, although much remains to be done. We are going slowly, but with a firm step”, she assures.

In this sense, the Gaby Ocete base highlights the fundamental role played by social networks and digital marketing. “Yes, I have noticed a change when it comes to treating female athletes, especially at the level of communication, press, information. When I started, almost 20 years ago, I remember that there was practically nothing, the little you could see was in a newspaper and in a very small space”. Thus, women’s basketball has also advanced, “we have taken a step forward. Some matches are shown on television, all are broadcast via streaming, but it is true that perhaps not as much as we would like”.

One of the important aspects in which the step must be taken is in the professionalization of the Endesa Women’s League. “It is the best way to value what we do. I think we should be considered a professional sport and that is what we are fighting for”, continues Ocete.

Achieving real equality between men and women must be a joint action, but sometimes “we throw stones at our own roof. We see it on social media when we criticize each other, when we really should stand up for each other more. It is true that sometimes we are too bad instead of being united and supporting each other.” However, Gaby Ocete points out that “many men have taken a step forward in this regard, especially those who have a greater scope. I have seen that they have done it on many occasions, but it is not only saying it, but doing it more”.

Along these lines, Krisztina Raksányi highlights the ability of sport to reach people and create awareness. “It’s a great loudspeaker and the people who have the power or who have more followers, can do more things than the smaller ones.” With extensive experience and many experiences, she speaks five languages: Hungarian, Spanish, English, Serbian and German, she has also lived in three countries, she considers that “equality is not real, much more can be done. In sports, especially, men earn more than women and this is a problem all over the world. Men’s sport is a little more spectacular and therefore they have more support, but we women work and train the same or more and we should have the same support and conditions as them”, she asserts.

Knowing so many languages ??and cultures, he recognizes that “in Spain there is more talk of equality than in other countries”. For example, “Hungary is a more conservative country, but I think we are improving. There is a lot to do there and in Serbia too, where my family is from. I think that in that part of Europe there is still a lot to be achieved”. Although he believes there are differences between men’s and women’s basketball, “not only because men are more physical and can do more things that are spectacular for people, that attract more attention, but women’s basketball is a little more tactical . We also do very good things that people can enjoy.” What’s more, “in Hungary, especially, there are cities where women’s basketball is more followed and popular than men’s,” she concludes proudly.

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